Aug 22, 2022

The Federal Government Reports an Increase in Traffic Deaths

The Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control asks the public to help reduce DUIs

Sacramento – The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is calling on the public to help reduce DUIs after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported an increase in traffic deaths across the country.

NHTSA estimates that 9,560 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes in the first quarter of 2022. This is an increase of about seven percent compared to the 8,935 fatalities projected for the same quarter in 2021. This marks the highest number of first-quarter fatalities since 2002.

According to NHTSA, drivers are making riskier decisions when they’re behind the wheel. In 2020, 11,654 people died in drunk-driving crashes — a 14 percent increase from 2019.

ABC in partnership with NHTSA, the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS), and California Highway Patrol (CHP) is participating in the annual high-visibility Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, which focuses on preventing impaired driving and improving safety for all road users. The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign runs from August 17 to September 5.

“ABC will work with its traffic safety partners and encourage the public to help prevent impaired driving by designating a sober driver,” said ABC Director Eric Hirata.

ABC protects communities through education and by administering prevention and enforcement programs designed to increase compliance with California’s alcoholic beverage laws. To learn more about ABC programs that help protect communities and prevent alcohol-related harm visit ABC enforcement programs or ABC prevention programs.

ABC is a Department of the Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency.

Contact

Additional information may be obtained by contacting:

John Carr, Public Information Officer
3927 Lennane Drive, Suite 100
Sacramento, CA 95834
Email: pio@abc.ca.gov
Phone: (916) 419-2525

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